A brief history Of Lotteries In Europe

Around the end of the middle ages in Europe certain countries started creating national lotteries. The original premise of starting a lottery was to raise funds for the needs of the public, and to complete the greatest of public works. It quickly became an important form of gambling that to this day more people gamble on than anything else.

The first European lottery began in 1466 in Holland when the widow of great Flemish painter Jan van Eyck promoted the lottery in Bruges to find winners for some expensive paintings to which buyers were not easy to find Lottery Sambad. Lotteries in the 16th and 17th centuries more often than not offered physical prizes as opposed to cash. As seen in the first English lottery in 1569 which offered silverware and tapestries as prizes.

In France in the year 1530 Frances I of France started a government lottery to help with the country’s growing financial problems. The popularity of lotteries in France continued to grow until 1776 when a new law destroyed all private lotteries, when they dipped in popularity till 1836 when all public lotteries were abolished. In 1844 the lottery made a comeback to France with the new condition that the profits be used to help charitable causes and to encourage the finer arts.

Italy took it’s first foray into lottery games in 1539 with the establishment of “La Lotto De Firenze”, the very first Italian lottery, organised in Florence. The real popularity of the Italian lottery stemmed from the fact that they were one of the first to offer cash prizes. Once the citizens of other Italian cities saw the big cash prizes being awarded in Florence they soon nearly all followed suit. By 1863 the game was so massively enjoyed that the first National Italian Lottery was founded, simply titled “Lotto”. Since then the funds raised from weekly drawings have become key to the state revenue of Italy.

Since the days of single country lotteries that had tapestries and silverware for prizes we have entered an age of pan-European lotteries that offer enormous cash prizes. The minimum jackpot prize for the multi-nation Euromillions lottery for instance is €15, 000, 000. Euromillion’s jackpots frequently rollover and the potential prize money can reach as high as €190 million. At some point, we’ve all thought about what we would do if we won the lottery. Even if you’ve never played, the thought is almost impossible to ignore whenever you hear about someone winning tens (or even hundreds) of millions of dollars. With all that money at stake, it’s tempting to see past the overwhelming odds and towards the glimmers of hope that stir up all kinds of emotions. Of course everybody would like to have more money, and there is simply no other way to potentially make so much money with so little effort. Because of this, it’s easy to get sucked into the fantasy of winning.

So we focus on all the things we would buy and all the problems that would go away. We think about the happiness and excitement of being able to afford everything we’ve ever wanted as well as the relief of never having to worry about money again. We focus on all the reasons people play the lottery in the first place, but that’s usually where most people stop thinking. It’s far less exciting to think about the more practical concerns associated with winning the lottery, and there seems to be little reason to worry about potential burdens we will probably never encounter.

However, even greater than the probability of any given individual failing to win the lottery jackpot is the likelihood that someone eventually will win it. And of the select few people who are fortunate enough to fall into that category, even fewer are likely to be prepared for what comes next. And what comes next is nothing short of a whole new life with a whole new set of concerns.

Most people have had their entire lifetime to adapt to the idea of having too little money, but far fewer know how to handle a sudden excess of it. I hesitate to use the term “too much money, ” but when the amount is so large that a person is unable to maintain control of it, that is essentially what it becomes. Now of course, the average person is unlikely to feel much sympathy for a recent lottery winner. But it is worth noting that a staggeringly high percentage of people’s lives have actually been ruined by winning the lottery. Aside from countless examples of winners going bankrupt, many have also developed various addictions and destructive habits, several have taken their own lives, and a few have even been murdered.

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